Paul Savage

Comedian, host, cartoonist, astronaut, occasional liar

Not every story needs to be told a thousand times

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My mate Tony is clever and funny and a wonderful writer, and good fun to get drunk with. He is also wrong. At a cellular level, he is factually, objectively wrong.

For Tony believes that not only could Indiana Jones be rebooted with a new actor, that it would be a good thing.

Now, the Indiana Jones trilogy is almost perfect (Temple of Doom really isn’t that much cop). And it definitely is a trilogy. They thought about making a fourth one, but that was considered a bad idea by all, and it never happened. Nothing can be gained by adding to it. Only taken away.

“ah” a specific set of douchebag cries “The original thing still exists. They aren’t changing that”. So why then when I hear Dick Dale’s Miserlou am i no longer reminded of Pulp Fiction, but instead involuntarily made to mentally shout ‘Pump it! Louder!’. Beause the Black Eyed Peas suck, but their hooks are insiduous.

I got into a discussion with someone the other day about Alan Moore. Now Alan Moore is crazy as hell (he claims to have met the fictional character John Constantine in real life. A fictional character he created. And met him after he created him. Met him. In real life. Twice), but he does have some brilliant work in the comic book/ graphic novel medium, and some of it has not translated well to screen. Alan Moore has refused millions of pounds for his numerous works to be adapted into films (when such adaptations produced the Johnny Depp film From Hell and the lamentable League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, you certainly see where he’s coming from. Both of those books are ace, by the way).

Anyway, whoever I was discussing it with was telling Alan Moore to stop being a baby and take the money because no adaptation would be perfect. Alan Moore has said he doesn’t want adaptations because he wrote them in one format, the format they were best suited for. This, essentially, is my problem. I don’t know why we have to have all stories in all formats.

For example, take the 2010 film inception, in which Leonardo Di Caprio plays Cobb, a man who can navigate other people’s dream worlds. The movie ends with him reunited with his kids (or does it? ahhh)

Then see what happens afterwards, in this spin off TV series, which sees Cobb (now played by Leonardo DiCaprio’s non-union Canadian version: The guy from Arrow) and his kids solving mysteries around the world.

But how did he get together with his wife? See the tie in graphic novel where they go to school together. She hates him at first, they aren’t going to get together! (until they do)

What does Ellen Page’s character do with her new found power? She opens up a dream based detective agency in picturesque Cedar Falls, Ohio, and learns some life lessons from the charming cast of small town folks in this quirky sitcom

But what if you just loved the movie? Then you’ll love the stage based musical “Together in Electric Dreams”, where the film you love is told again by amateur singers through the back catalogue of The Human League! See Marion Cotilliard’s character sing “Don’t you want me baby” as she shoots Cobb in a snow covered chase. Why does Cobb “keep feeling fascination” with her? See Michael Caine’s character do something with a 4th Human League song I can’t be bothered to google. Coming to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, 2015

 

One Response to “Not every story needs to be told a thousand times”

  1. Neil says:

    I agree with you almost entirely, apart from the fact I am now considering writing, “Together in Electric Dreams”

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